Operation & Maintenance

In the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey, the devastating storm that recently swept through central Texas, both the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) and the U.S. Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board (CSB) are urging special precautions to minimize the impact of the storm on pipeline and other energy infrastructure in the state.

Continue Reading PHMSA and CSB Urge Special Precautions in the Wake of Hurricane Harvey

During the last week of the Obama Administration, PHMSA released a pre-publication copy of the hazardous liquid pipeline safety final rule, which has been six years in the making.  The rulemaking was intended to address issues raised by several sources: high profile pipeline accidents; directives contained in amendments to the Pipeline Safety Act; and recommendations from the NTSB and GAO.  The final rule would implement many significant and expansive inspection and reporting requirements, including periodic integrity assessments and leak detection for pipelines outside of high consequence areas (HCAs), inspections of pipelines after extreme weather events, expanded reporting, and more stringent integrity management repair and data collection requirements.

Continue Reading Fate of Extensive Liquid Pipeline Final Rule Uncertain

Citing concerns that intrastate and small gas transmission pipeline operators may not be accurately identifying high consequence areas (HCAs) as part of their integrity management programs (IMP), PHMSA issued yet another advisory to the industry on December 12, 2016.  In its seventh advisory issued this year, PHMSA explains the need for further guidance on the methodology based on recent inspections as well as a Safety Recommendation issued by the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) in 2015 (NTSB Recommendation P-15-06, issued in conjunction with the Board’s Safety Study of implementation of gas transmission integrity management rules).

Continue Reading Concerns about HCA Identification Methods Prompts Advisory

PHMSA has issued an interim final rule (IFR) to establish – for the first time ever – minimum federal standards for underground natural gas storage facilities.  The IFR imposes significant new requirements in a short timeframe for “downhole facilities,” including wells, wellbore tubing and casings at underground natural gas storage facilities.  The IFR addresses construction, maintenance, risk management and integrity management procedures for these facilities and incorporates the requirements of recent API industry Recommended Practices (RPs) 1170 for salt caverns storing natural gas and 1171 for storage in depleted hydrocarbon reservoirs and aquifer reservoirs.  In addition, the IFR requires underground gas storage operators to prepare and file annual reports, incident reports, safety-related condition repairs and register their facilities in the PHMSA operator registry.

Continue Reading Underground Natural Gas Storage Interim Final Rule Issued

PHMSA has rescheduled the public meetings of the Gas Pipeline Advisory Committee (GPAC) for January 11-12, 2017.  The purpose of these meetings is to discuss PHMSA’s proposed gas mega rule and the underlying regulatory analysis.  The meetings were previously scheduled for December 7-8, 2016, but have been rescheduled based on the availability of committee members and resources.

Continue Reading GPAC Public Meetings to Discuss PHMSA Gas Rule Rescheduled

The Gas Pipeline Advisory Committee (GPAC) will meet in Washington, D.C. next month to discuss PHMSA’s proposed gas rules.  The meetings are scheduled for Wednesday and Thursday, December 7-8, 2017, from 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. both days.  The meetings will not be webcast, but materials will become available on the www.regulations.gov website within 30 days after the sessions end (search for docket number PHMSA-2016-0136).  PHMSA asks anyone planning to attend to register by December 1.

Continue Reading GPAC to Discuss PHMSA’s Pending Gas Pipeline Rulemaking

A previously abandoned natural gas pipeline exploded in Seattle, Washington on March 9, 2016, injuring nine firefighters, destroyed two buildings, and damaged multiple nearby structures.  The entity responsible for regulating intrastate and interstate gas pipelines in the state, the Washington Utilities and Transportation Commission, recently released a report from its investigation of the incident, concluding that it was caused by (1) external damage to the above-ground portion of the service line; and (2) improper abandonment of the line, which had not been cut and capped when it was taken out of service in 2004.  The report highlights the importance of adhering to federal regulatory requirements concerning proper pipeline abandonment, which was also the subject of a recent PHMSA Advisory Bulletin issued in response to a Congressional directive in the 2016 PIPES Act.

Continue Reading Pipeline Blast Highlights Necessity of Proper Abandonment Procedures

PHMSA issued an advisory to operators regarding the applicability of its safety regulations to idled, inactive and abandoned pipe.  Congress directed PHMSA to issue such an advisory in the recent PIPES Act of 2016, in response to several high profile incidents involving idled pipe.  While operators frequently refer to idled, decommissioned, mothballed and/or inactive pipe, PHMSA does not recognize those terms.  In its advisory, the Agency explains that it considers pipelines to be either active and subject to all relevant safety regulations or abandoned (i.e. permanently removed from service).  With respect to a pipeline that is “purged” of all combustibles but not yet formally abandoned, PHMSA confirms its current practice of accepting deferral of certain activities, including inline inspection, as long as deferred activities are completed prior to or as part of returning a pipeline to service.  This is consistent with prior PHMSA guidance.

Continue Reading Pipe Subject to Safety Regulations Until Formally Abandoned: PHMSA Advisory

A recent PHMSA Advisory Bulletin warns the pipeline industry about Corrosion Under Insulation (CUI), which is frequently used on pipe transporting heavy crude oil.  Such products are often heated for more efficient transport, thus the pipe is wrapped with foam insulation over the coating, and then further covered with a tape wrap over the insulation.  The crude oil release from a Plains All American pipeline near Santa Barbara in May of 2015 used such thermal insulation, and the government’s investigation following that release prompted this Advisory from PHMSA.

Continue Reading Advisory Bulletin Warns About Corrosion Under Insulation

PHMSA’s expansive Natural Gas Notice of Proposed Rulemaking will be published in the Federal Register tomorrow, April 8, 2016.  The Agency released a pre-publication version of its proposed rulemaking several weeks ago, but note that the Federal Register pre-publication version of what will be officially published tomorrow contains slight non-substantive differences from the Agency’s prior released version (e.g., capitalizations, movement of certain proposed revisions among subsections, etc.).  The proposal significantly expands numerous requirements for gas transmission and gathering pipelines.  Publication in the Federal Register triggers the start of the comment period, with comments due on or before June 7, 2016, unless an extension is granted.  Due to the complexity and volume of the proposed changes, several industry trade groups already have requests pending for a 60 day extension of the comment deadline.